Lucky Linden Tiny House Tour: Overview

Lucky Linden Tiny House Tour: Overview

Our professional pictures are done! And ready to be shared with you. I'm planning a series of posts that explore the areas of our house in more detail, but I just can't wait to share some of the fantastic shots that Becky took of our house. All photos credit: Becky Green Photography, www.beckygreenphotos.com

The gate we use to access our spot.

The gate we use to access our spot.

From the road, the house is partially hidden by a fence, and there is a large 10' wide gate that we used to pull the house through when we moved it here. The Linden design features a roof where the ridge runs the short direction on the trailer, and therefore has a large shed roof dormer on the back (tongue end of the trailer) and a cute gable dormer on the front. The picture above is a good side view, so you can see how the roofline works.

I absolutely adore our front porch. 

I absolutely adore our front porch. 

We opted for a full porch across the short width of the house. I have lots of thoughts on tiny house porches - probably best saved for another post - but let's just say I am SO HAPPY we chose to have a full porch like this. It's 30" deep, which is just enough for two wicker chairs and the perfect spot for morning coffee or after dinner wine. 

The view from the front door. And in the mirror, our wonderful photographer, Becky. Hi Becky!

The view from the front door. And in the mirror, our wonderful photographer, Becky. Hi Becky!

From the front door you can see most of the house. We have a rather large (relatively speaking) sitting area, which is to the right. I promise a better picture of that in just a minute. Our kitchen has a small peninsula. The counter overhangs on the sitting area side by 9", so we have enough room for a single stool. This becomes our work area, breakfast spot, and even prep area for cooking. If one person is in the kitchen, the other can sit here and still be involved in the meal prep process. To the left, you can see our dressing area. We have the full length mirror, and to the left of the mirror is what I call our cubby area. More on that in a bit. Our stairs start with the footstool in green. Then the next step is the bench, then the armrest behind the blue pillow, then the counter, and on up to the sleeping loft via the bracket steps I built.

Yes, we really have enough room to sit upright in bed!

Yes, we really have enough room to sit upright in bed!

One of Dan's must-haves in the design was a King size bed. Well, we have it! Our sleeping loft is all bed - wall to wall to wall to railing. The head of the bed is against the side wall, with the two windows being at the back of the house/tongue end of the trailer. This gives us a nice flat headboard and a good cross breeze from the windows. It also means we can have our TV mounted on the wall at the foot of the bed (not pictured, it's to the left of the frame). It's the most luxurious TV watching experience! 

The front loft is our storage area (you can see my suitcase on the left, in green) and we have room for a reading nook. 

The front loft is our storage area (you can see my suitcase on the left, in green) and we have room for a reading nook. 

Although the light is blocking the view a bit, you can see our front loft in this picture. It's mostly empty right now, just a little bit of storage and a few pillows for a reading area. The TV is mounted to the left, at the foot of the bed. I made a suspended entertainment area that hangs above the TV, and the plug for the electronics is behind the screen so all of our cords are totally hidden. We have a DVD player, a Wii U, and a Roku TV that is our whole entertainment setup. We don't pay for cable. We just use our phones as hotspots for Netflix and Amazon Prime video. 

Our custom built-in couch, and IKEA Norden gateleg table. 

Our custom built-in couch, and IKEA Norden gateleg table. 

Our living area is roughly half of our downstairs square footage. I did this on purpose, because it's the area we hang out in, it's the space that gets the most use. I also wanted to have enough space that Dan and I could both lounge comfortably together. The L shape helps tremendously. The short leg of the L is 4', measured from the wall to the edge by the door. The long end of the L is 7', measured from the windows to where it ends at the kitchen counter. Our IKEA Norden table is amazingly flexible. It has two leaves that can flip up, to make a table that is the perfect size to fit against the long side of the couch. We could probably fit 6 people around it if we wanted to! Most of the time we just flip up one side and pull it to the couch, for the two of us to eat dinner or play a game. When we are not using the table, it's a nice sideboard and catchall for coming in the door. It also stores a surprising amount of things in the drawers.

If you're wondering what I'm doing, the dogs were going bonkers for their breakfast. So I was dumping some wet dog food into a dish for them. 

If you're wondering what I'm doing, the dogs were going bonkers for their breakfast. So I was dumping some wet dog food into a dish for them. 

Welcome to our kitchen. We made the counter top from scratch! It was a big project but I am so happy with how it turned out. The wood is maple, red oak, and walnut that we ripped into strips and glued up in chunks. Then they got planed down and endlessly sanded. We have a 3 burner propane cook top, a 24" wide farm sink, an under counter refrigerator, and 4 cabinets. Two rails with hooks hold our pans and cooking utensils. A small shelf behind the cook top holds our 4 cups: two water glasses and two mugs. Our dish drainer is also our storage location for our plates: two large dinner plates and two small salad plates. 

The pot rack and cooking utensils are very convenient!

The pot rack and cooking utensils are very convenient!

Magnets are super useful in a small kitchen. Our chefs knife has it's own spot on the wall, which we made with just two neodymium disc magnets. Our spices also have a spot right above our head at the cook top, again using neodymium magnets. If you want to make a spice rack like this, check out my how-to post. 

Our cubbies are so useful!

Our cubbies are so useful!

Our closet, toiletries, and lots of other things live in what I think of as our high-density storage. It's a shelving unit I designed and built that has 33" wide, 16" deep shelves on the front which we use for clothing. Dan has two shelves, I have two shelves. We share 4 baskets for socks and underclothes, and my collection of scarves. At the bottom is a larger space for a hamper. The shelving unit is set about 8" away from the wall, creating a tall and deep storage area which I call the cubbies. They are accessible from this side, as you can see me pulling out a bin, but also accessible from the bathroom side, where they hold towels, cleaning supplies, extra paper towel and toilet paper. The cubbies on this side hold a variety of things. Dan and I each have a personal one for our toiletries. One bin holds small card games. One has snacks, like granola bars and tea packets. A double high cubby holds two water dispensers, which we use for drinking water because there is an artesian well not far from us that has better tasting water than our tap. 

Teeny tiny shower, but it's functional and actually quite nice with the rain head.

Teeny tiny shower, but it's functional and actually quite nice with the rain head.

Our bathroom in the tiny house is intentionally very small. The shower is just 24" x 24", with the shower curtain hung a bit outward for more space at the top. I look at it this way: I spend most of my day doing things outside the bathroom - cooking, lounging, eating a meal, etc. so I would rather have more space in those areas than in the bathroom, which I spend very little time in. So my design reflects these choices. Tiny bathroom, decent sized kitchen, and a large living area. When I see a tiny house design with a huge bathroom but only enough room for a love seat, or worse just a single chair to sit down, it confuses me. We spend most of our lives living not bathrooming. 

Yuppers, it's a composting toilet.

Yuppers, it's a composting toilet.

Yes, we have a composting toilet. No, it doesn't smell. No, it's not super gross. I like it better than a flush toilet, actually. Ours is called the Nature's Head. Maybe I'll do another post more in depth on our system later. Our bathroom also holds our broom and Swiffer mop, both very important in a tiny house. It's incredible how dirty the floors get! And you can just barely see the other cubbies on this side, with TP and paper towel and our bath towels and other bathroom kinds of things. There is a tiny trash can next to the toilet (with a lid! We have dogs!) and the green spray bottle is for our toilet. 

We love our tiny house!

We love our tiny house!

That's it for the tour! Thanks for following along and I hope you enjoyed seeing our house and how we chose to design it. 

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